Category Archives: Nonfiction

Early American Policing:

The Thieves of Threadneedle Street: The Incredible True Story of the American Forgers Who Nearly Broke the Bank of England” by Nicholas Booth –

“across the United States was a patchwork quilt of localised detectives who were either overwhelmed or incompetent. Their sights were never set much higher than the next county line. There was neither a national police force nor any central, federal repository of information. A simple check with records in other cities would have flagged the Bidwells up so much sooner. ‘The police authority throughout the country at this time was purely a local matter’, is how one academic review succinctly summarises the situation. Unless a crime was committed against the public mails or committed on the high seas, the federal government could not do a thing.”

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Crime is worse today than ever before?

The Thieves of Threadneedle Street: The Incredible True Story of the American Forgers Who Nearly Broke the Bank of England” by Nicholas Booth –

“The Windy City in the 1860s was the sort of town where you could not help becoming involved in crime. ‘If the Angel Gabriel came to Chicago,’ an appalled evangelist remarked at the time, ‘he would lose his character.’ Though lawlessness characterised much of the contemporary American experience, nowhere was it quite as acute as on the shores of Lake Michigan and the self-styled ‘gem of the prairie’. ‘Chicago’s ecological position as the gateway to the unsettled lands of the west also contributed to its involvement in crime,’ notes one professor of modern jurisprudence in the city. It was the start – both figuratively and literally – of the ‘Wild West’.”

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Lives Worth Saving

 “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” by J.K. Rowling –

“I’d like to appeal to all our listeners to emulate their example, perhaps by casting a protective charm over any Muggle dwellings in your street. Many lives could be saved if such simple measures are taken.” 

“And what would you say, Royal, to those who reply that in these dangerous times, it should be ‘Wizards first’?” asked Lee. 

“I’d say that it’s one short step from ‘Wizards first’ to ‘Purebloods first,’ and then to ‘Death Eaters,’” replied Kingsley. “We’re all human, aren’t we? Every human life is worth the same, and worth saving.””

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Is Ann Coulter ProLife?

I really don’t think so. This is the second time she’s written with a negative tone about immigrants and “their expensive premature babies”. This whole chapter is on how WORTHLESS (her words, NOT mine) most recent immigrants to America are. I guess that for her, the only lives that matter are American, if and only if they’re like minded Conservatives (she seems to think liberals are better off dead, too, rather than wasting her time, space, and money).

“Adios, America: The Left’s Plan to Turn Our Country into a Third World Hellhole” by Ann Coulter –

“So it’s lucky, in a way, that Democrats are the party of government workers. Unending immigration means we need rafts of government workers to educate non-English speakers, teach cultural sensitivity classes, arrest criminals, man prisons, clean up parks, distribute food stamps, arrange subsidized housing, and work in hospital emergency rooms to deliver all those premature babies.”

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Anti-Choice is misogynistic

 “Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg” by Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik –

“Unable to win majority support, over time anti-choice advocates began to justify restrictions on abortion as protecting women and not just the unborn. Kennedy’s opinion reflects the influence of this new anti-abortion argument. 

This way of thinking reflects ancient notions about women’s place in the family and under the Constitution— ideas that have long since been discredited. 

RBG is calling out the rationale for prohibiting abortion as “protecting women.” She says that this kind of anti-abortion argument reflects and reinforces the very stereotypes about women’s decision-making capacity and social roles that the court struck down as unconstitutional in sex discrimination cases— including in ones RBG argued herself. Once again, women are being told not to worry their pretty heads about it, this is for their own good.”

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On marriage

 “Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg” by Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik –

“What Wiesenfeld meant by “alternative,” and what was hinted by RBG’s use of the phrase life partner was a marriage in which the woman didn’t lose herself and her autonomy, in which two humans shared their lives and goals on equal footing. It wasn’t so common anywhere, least of all among people who came of age in the 1950s.”

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Captain Susan Struck

 “Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg” by Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik –

“never considered herself a feminist, but she also didn’t behave like women were supposed to. For one thing, she had volunteered to be sent to Vietnam . In 1970, when she got pregnant, she refused to quit or get an abortion, the only options the military offered her. Ironically, abortion was still illegal almost everywhere in the United States, and it was a shock when , in 1969, radical feminists had held the first-ever abortion speak-out in a church basement in New York. Military bases were the exception.

 Struck, raised Catholic, had enough sick leave saved up to give birth and give her baby up for adoption. So Struck kept ignoring, then challenging, her discharge notices. She turned to the ACLU for help. RBG jumped at the chance to build a gradual case that reproductive freedom was a condition of equality, beginning with a woman who didn’t want an abortion. She couldn’t help but notice the hypocrisy of a country that banned abortion except when it was convenient for the military.”
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Woman’s Choice…

 “Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg” by Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik –

“The problem the WRP faced in connecting pregnancy to their line of sex-discrimination cases was this: Even if a man could take care of the kids and the elders, and a woman could join the air force and handle the family finances, only one of them could get pregnant and give birth. RBG and her team had to convince the justices that pregnancy too was a matter of equality— or inequality— and not just something special that women indulged in, off on their own. Even more radically, RBG wanted the Supreme Court to recognize that women would never be equal if they could not control their reproductive lives, whether they wanted to be pregnant or not. That meant the right to an abortion, and it meant the right to be free of discrimination for staying pregnant.”

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All great journies begin with a single step.

 “Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg” by Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik –

“RBG learned a lesson that would stay with her for the rest of her life. She had been trying to teach the justices, and she wouldn’t give up. But as she later acknowledged, “one doesn’t learn that lesson in a day. Generally, change in our society is incremental, I think. Real change , enduring change, happens one step at a time.” She would have to be patient. She would have to be strategic. And maybe a little deaf.”

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